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More than a Program,
Persevere is a Movement

What started with one man’s life changing experience, has grown to thousands of life changing experiences for hundreds of men and women in multiple states across the country. And we’re just getting started.

Our History

Persevere began in 2012, two years before its incorporation in 2014, as our Founder, Sean Hosman, was released from jail after serving time for a drug-related offense. He realized that he could earn a living thanks to his advanced technology skills, while others with criminal records struggled to find jobs. His initial efforts to help men one at a time evolved into what Persevere is today – an organization serving hundreds of justice-involved and at-risk individuals in community and correctional settings in more than 5 states.

Meet Our Founder, Sean Hosman

“I was trying to be a dad and a husband while also running this company and battling addiction and alcoholism. I thought I could balance it, and of course, there is no balance in addiction. I was arrested 12 times in two years. My experiences made me think of a concept I’ve kept coming back to ever since: ready, willing and enabled. I knew I couldn’t quit on my own, but some people around me enabled me to make a change. And I mean “enabled” in the true sense of the word. They gave me the ability to do what I knew needed to be done. They empowered me.” And so Persevere was born.

“Persevere offers a one-year programming course for people behind prison walls so they can become full-stack developers. This includes life-skill classes, support, and even transitional housing. The success rates at Persevere have been phenomenal, and I couldn’t be more proud. I wanted to take it a step further and make sure these graduates had every opportunity to succeed, so I created Banyan Labs. This tech company is there to hire them after release, giving them an opportunity to develop software and work on a real team so they’ll have the experience they need to build a thriving career.

Our population needs truly viable skills with real opportunities to succeed. Technology offers meaningful jobs, careers, and even entrepreneurship. I always say technology is the great equalizer. It’s a language that people in those circumstances often haven’t learned yet. Coding is a language that puts them back in the world.

The results couldn’t be better. Those who graduate from Persevere and are released have a 93% job placement rate and 85% job retention rate. The plan is working; we are changing lives. And this isn’t the end. I can’t wait to see where these students and graduates go from here.”

– Sean Hosman, Founder of Persevere

Persevere’s Timeline of Expansion

PERSEVERE’S EXPANSION INTO NEW FACILITIES:

Persevere Courses Were Added To 11 Facilities In 2 Years

2023

COMING SOON
Nebraska

2022

JANUARY
Atlanta, GA.

Metro Reentry Facility

JULY
Nashville, TN.
Debra K. Johnson Rehabilitation Center

2021

MARCH
Eloy, AZ.

Saguaro Correctional Center

MAY
Columbia, SC.
Camille Griffin Graham Correctional Center

AUGUST
Richmond, VA.
Virginia Correctional Center for Women

2020

JANUARY
Goodyear, AZ.
ASPC Perryville San Carlos

OCTOBER
Eloy, AZ.
Red Rock Correctional Center Center

2019

APRIL
Henning, TN.
Women's Therapeutic Residential Center

MAY
Memphis, TN.
Mark Lutrell Transition Center

SEPTEMBER
Hartsville, TN.
Trousdale Turner Correctional Center

OCTOBER
Tucson, AZ.
ASPC Tucson Whetstone Unit

PERSEVERE’S  PROGRAM EXPANSION: 

Persevere added 5 New Programs in 4 Years

2023

JANUARY
- Families First

- Persevere Works

FEBRUARY
Tennessee Technology Workforce Alliance
(Tech Alliance)

COMING SOON
EPIC Youth

2022

OCTOBER
The National Institute to Unlock Potential

2021

MARCH
2 GEN

Get Involved

We believe, and are committed to, communities and various stakeholders working together to form coalitions and create partnerships to bring education, housing, jobs, and mental health and substance abuse services to their respective areas. Too many people are affected by the criminal justice system, recidivism, and lack of access to critical resources and services. Too many of our minority populations have been drastically and disproportionately impacted.

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